Features


Not a school in sight: Autistic children travel 500 km to learn

Pontsho Pilane

A mother's love led her to South Africa to find a school for her son with autism.


Saved: How drug users gained the power to reverse overdoses

Carrie Arnold

Find out how drug users banded together to use a simple injection to save thousands of lives.


After Ebola: What happens when the virus fades and the NGOs — and money — leave?

Clarissa Sosin

Ebola wiped out nearly 10% of Liberia’s doctors and nurses. Take a look at life for those it left behind.


Old birth rites, new ways

Bhekisisa Reporters

When bringing a new life into the world risks taking another, even old traditions have to adopt new ways.


Speak more than one language? This is what it does to your brain.

Gaia Vince

Speaking more than one language could lead to better tests scores and even being a more empathetic person.


Who killed Ntombizodwa Matthews? Politics, protest & corruption in the North West

Bhekisisa Reporters

A month after she was wheeled out of a North West hospital in a barrow, Ntombizodwa Matthews met her end. Her family blames politics for her death.


Football’s dashed hopes: The teenagers sold a Premier League lie

Pete Pattisson, The Guardian

They thought they were signing up for a dream but it turned out to be a trafficking nightmare.


Black? A woman? Read why you’re more likely to be a victim of online trolls

Gaia Vince

Are social media algorithms designed to prey the mental health of women and people of colour?


These hospitals have become a home away from home in the Maasai's fight against TB

Christabel Ligami, Adri Kotze

When TB strikes, the fight to live can come at the cost of a way of life for the country's nomads. This could help ease the pain.


What do your period and bananas have in common? Find out

In Rwanda, schoolgirls can now buy locally produced, cheaper sanitary towels


'I told them I had a miscarriage. But the nurses knew what had really happened'

Ryan Lenora Brown, Adri Kotze

Go inside the international network of women willing to break the law to give people access to termination of pregnancy services.


When there was no list of free abortion clinics, we made our own. Here's how.

Joan van Dyk

How we found the country's 'missing' abortion providers – and mapped contraception services too.


Go inside the trucker craze fuelling a blackmarket in dangerous 'sex enhancers'

Tawanda Karombo, Adri Kotze

The products themselves could be dangerous and are likely to encourage high-risk sexual behaviour.


How to tell your child you have HIV

Kristen van Schie

More than three decades into the HIV epidemic, some conversations haven't become any easier. This is one of them.


This country figured out how to stop teen substance abuse, so why has no one else?

Emma Young

Find out which nordic nation radically cut teenage smoking, drinking and drug use and how they did it.


KZN cancer patients sent home with panados as treatment waiting lists grow

Joan van Dyk

State cancer patients have nowhere to turn, even if their cancer is treatable.


A new loo: Gaze into the toilet bowl of the future

Lina Zeldovich

Despite our complicated relationship with it, our poo could one day power our cell phones, tablets and laptops.


Meet the doctors: Take a look at this country's first crop of homegrown physicians

Ryan Lenora Brown

Finally capping its own medics, the country must now retain them and coax them into rural areas.


Climate change turns dehydration into a deadly epidemic

Jane Palmer

A new kidney disease is striking down labourers in what could be one of the first epidemics caused by global warming.


Afraid of death? Take comfort that you’ll live on in varied and surprising ways

Moheb Costandi

Most of us would rather not know what happens to our bodies after death. But that breakdown gives birth to new life in unexpected ways.


'I was married to a Boko Haram': What happens when a victim returns to her village?

Eromo Egbejule

Eighty two of the Chibok school girls, kidnapped by Boko Haram in Nigeria three years ago, have been released. But what now?


#FreeToBleed: The struggle of being too poor to afford pads

Pontsho Pilane

Choosing between eating and bleeding through your school uniform comes at a cost.


3D-printed prosthetic limbs: the next revolution in medicine

Ian Birrell

The process could transform manufacturing and help the 30 million people worldwide in need of artificial limbs and braces.


'It didn't take long for [the fetus] to come out. There was a human-like form.'

Ina Skosana

Left with little choice, many women turn to illegal abortionists to terminate their pregnancies.


Could this birth trend make for more serene deliveries?

Pontsho Pilane

Water births are a growing phenomenon in South Africa and globally. But this birth method is controversial – scientific evidence is lacking.


Could this country be among the world's best for refugees?

Mugume Davis Rwakaringi

Many Ugandans were once refugees themselves. Now, they are 'paying back the good' and making their country one of the best in the world for refugees.


When the sorrow doesn't end: Could chronic grief be a medical condition?

Andrea Volpe

The pain of bereavement is supposed to ease with time. When it doesn't, psychiatrists call it 'complicated grief' and it can be treated.


When the sorrow doesn't end: Could chronic grief be a medical condition?

Andrea Volpe

The pain of bereavement is supposed to ease with time. When it doesn't, psychiatrists call it 'complicated grief' and it can be treated.


Africa's oldest psychiatric hospital a stark reminder of war and a forgotten people

Ryan Lenora Brown

After Sierra Leone’s civil war, money poured in for mental health services. But a decade later, there's little left to help Ebola’s victims.


Africa's oldest psychiatric hospital a stark reminder of war and a forgotten people

Ryan Lenora Brown

After Sierra Leone’s civil war, money poured in for mental health services. But a decade later, there's little left to help Ebola’s victims.