Short Form

Short Form Journalism by the Bhekisisa Team

Everyday life in Cairo: but the city has become a hub for the organ trade.

Organ trafficking: ‘They locked me in and took my kidney’

Desperate to reach Europe, migrants from Africa are travelling to Egypt to sell body parts to pay for their passage.

‘An African man like me depressed?’ Why representation matters in the movies

The continent’s largest film industry has been getting mental health all wrong with dangerous consequences. Now, that’s changing.
Zimbabwe's tough abortion laws aren't curbing terminations

Inside the illegal abortion market: ‘I nearly touched hell’

Zimbabwe’s tight abortion laws aren’t curbing demand, they’re driving them underground — and it’s about to get worse.
Maasai girls participate in a newly conceived rite of passage to mark their ascent into womanhood

When police crashed her wedding, she was 8. Her soon-to-be husband was 67.

Across the continent, women are helping to reimagine a sacred rite of passage in an effort to honour their cultures and spare their bodies.
In good hands: Mozambique's nurses take up the scalpel for safer births

This map tells you which districts have the country’s highest c-section rates

Some districts report Caesarean rates of 40%, which is much higher than the 26% national average for public hospitals.
A medical scientist at the NICD prepares listeria samples for DNA sampling.

2018: The best, the worst and the weird

You made it through the year. Kick back, relax and take a read through the 2018 that was.
Angela Baloyi no longer sleeps in the room she shared with her five-year-old brother after a man snuck in one night and raped her. She was eight months’ pregnant.

‘I didn’t think it was necessary to use condoms because I was only 15.’

This province reported skyrocketing rates of teen pregnancy but behind the figures lies a story about sex, knowledge and data.
Through its branches

How many of these iconic protest posters can you recognise?

Here's the story of the Treatment Action Campaign or how a handful of people created a global movement that changed the world.
Amelie Chauke was able to keep up with her healthcare on the go and ensure her baby was born HIV negative with the help of farm-based clinics.

Plant, pick, pack: Finding Mpumalanga’s missing fruit pickers

In this province, the agricultural and mining sectors draw thousands of workers each year – and then they disappear. Here’s why we need to find them.
The Maji Mazuri institute in north-east Nairobi.

Investigation reveals shocking conditions at NGOs caring for disabled people

Report unearths neglect in Kenyan institutions, yet discrimination means children may be at risk of being killed if they remain in communities
Selling sex

Selling sex

From Amsterdam’s glittering canals to Durban’s dark streets, take a look at how the world legislates sex — and why it matters.
Jeanny Mbalati and her daughter Dinah outside their home in Soweto. It took them more than a year to get a loved one into a psychiatric hospital following his removal from Life Esidimeni facilities.

72 hours to care: The precarious road to psychiatric help

For many people with severe mental illnesses, these special wards can be a lifeline and the first step to care — if they can get there.
In Central African Republic

‘I was kicked out of our house by his parents’, say widows

If a man dies in the Central African Republic, his wife is at risk of being evicted from their home by his relatives.
Slavery ended in Mauritania in 1981 but tens of thousands still live in bondage.

This is what life is like in the world’s last country to ban slavery

Photojournalist, Seif Kousmate, photographed and interviewed current and former slaves in Mauritania and got imprisoned by police in the process.

Obesity: Is eating slap tjips as bad as smoking?

For millennials, it ain't looking good, but are hard-hitting campaigns just fat-shaming and counterproductive?
The Gambian court case is the first to hold an African head of state accountable for violating the rights of people living with HIV.

‘No sex, no coffee, no ARVs’: Former president’s quackery could land him in court

Former Gambian president Yahya Jammeh will be the first African head of state to be tried for violating the rights of HIV-positive people.