Videos

[WATCH] How to use pills to prevent TB

New guidelines from the health department say anti-TB pills are now available to anyone who’s had long contact with someone who is sick with TB, to stop them from falling ill too. Here’s how it works.

Health Beat #12 | How to cope with taking HIV meds for life

People with HIV get depressed more often than those without the virus. This can make it hard to take their daily, lifelong medication correctly. In this Health Beat episode, we visit someone who has been taking ARVs for 22 years and ask experts if allowing nurses to prescribe antidepressants would help.

[WATCH] Yvette Raphael’s incredible journey of two decades with HIV

South Africa’s HIV plan says nurses, not just doctors, should be able to prescribe antidepressants. HIV-positive people struggle with their mental health more than those without the virus. But is this plan enough to help them stick to their daily pill regimens? This activist says no. Watch her story to find out why.

How taking ARVs daily stops those with HIV from transmitting the virus

Mapeseka Mabena has spent a decade getting her HIV patients to start and stay on treatment. Taking ARVs every day can be taxing, but Mabena motivates people with a reminder that meds can help them have HIV-free children and stop them passing on the virus through sex. She explains how in this video.

Health Beat #13 | Why a hotter Earth could break health budgets

A hotter Earth is a threat to human health. It means more floods, droughts and heatwaves, which in turn make many diseases spread faster. Higher temperatures also exacerbate air pollution, resulting in more damage to our lungs. In this Health Beat episode we show you why climate change is our next pandemic.

What HIV does to your brain — and how ARVs halt that

Left untreated, an HIV infection can cause inflammation in someone’s brain and lead to mental health problems. But antiretrovirals can stop it from happening. Mia Malan finds out how it works in this Health Beat interview.

Health Beat #14 | Can we afford to not afford it? Why SA can’t...

Since fewer people are using condoms, we need more ways to prevent HIV. HIV prevention pills are free at government clinics, but the catch is that you have to take them every day. A two-monthly jab and monthly vaginal ring could change the game, but can the state afford them? Watch this Health Beat episode to find out.

[WATCH] How anti-cervical cancer jabs work

Most cervical cancer cases are caused by the human papillomavirus (HPV), which spreads through sex. Anti-HPV injections have been around since 2006 and getting the jab as a teenager can stop cervical cancer in about nine out of 10 women later in life. We break down how they work, what they cost and why they save lives.

We’ve come a long way, baby

On our 10th birthday, we’ve grown from a three-person health desk at the Mail & Guardian to an independent media organisation with a staff of 20 full and part-time employees. Today, we have an average of two million annual pageviews and we’ve expanded from print-only stories to television and podcasts. Want to know more? This seven-minute video has it all.

[WATCH] This nurse wants to stop cervical cancer in Hammanskraal

Nurse Tebogo Seleka does about 100 cervical cancer tests a month. One in ten patients test positive. This could be avoided if they were vaccinated against the human papillomavirus which causes this cancer. Our TV team travels to Hammanskraal near Tshwane to find out how Seleka is using jabs to stop cervical cancer in her community.

[WATCH] Why a hotter Earth makes dirty air more dangerous

Doctors have told Khehla Mahlangu and Jeremiah Maseko that their lungs are no good. They’ve lived and worked in Secunda in Mpumalanga for many years, where factories have dirtied the air. And now climate change is worsening things.

[WATCH] How Tshwane’s water is cleaned

How much water is in 16 Olympic-sized swimming pools? The same volume as what runs through Tshwane’s Rietvlei water treatment plant’s processes before it reaches household taps. Eunice Mokoena, a lead engineer at the facility, takes you on a tour via our TV team.

#BhekisisaDiaries: Why Zano Kunene writes rugby stories

From the pitch to print, health reporter Zano Kunene takes you on the journey of how his passion for sports led to writing on sports-related brain injuries.

Bhekisisa at 10: Here’s what went down at our recent birthday party

On November 7, Bhekisisa celebrated 10 years of health reporting. Policymakers, researchers and activists joined us in marking this milestone. We also sat down to discuss the twin threats of climate change and health.

Why your toilet water is turned into drinking water — and which provinces get...

Is the water in your tap safe? What about cleaning that in storage tanks? In this Health Beat interview, Mia Malan speaks to environmental scientist Ayesha Laher about the state of South Africa’s water systems, how you can test your water for germs and what you should do if your water isn’t clean.

Why climate change is the biggest threat to health this century

The world is in a polycrisis — and climate change will highlight vulnerabilities and inequalities in healthcare. We need to understand how changing weather patterns will affect our health and draw on lessons from past research to help us become more resilient. Here’s what experts said at Bhekisisa’s 10th birthday celebration on Tuesday, 7 November.