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Opinion pieces by Bhekisisa Contributors

Better prevention strategies are helping to stem the tide of HIV.

From medical circumcision to vaccines, these seven things will change HIV

We know more than ever about how to prevent HIV infection, including what may someday lead to the world's first HIV vaccine.
(Jessica Bordeau)

Why medical aids are putting the price of a safe delivery on some women’s...

When medical schemes and the law count conceiving as a pre-existing condition, pregnant women lose.
Lake Chad

Is one of Africa’s most important lakes really shrinking?

Our two-year study shows the lake has been stable since the 1990s. Costly ‘solutions’ shift focus from the complex causes of the...
Could MDMA one day come of the rave scene and into mainstream psychology? Emerging research may be a step in that direction.

Could this drug one day come out of the club and onto your therapist’s...

Ecstasy users are more empathetic than those who take other drugs – even when not on it.
An obese couple sits on the beach. Overweight and obesity have been recognised as crucial health issues and have been included in the sustainable development goals.

Obesity weighs heavily on Africa’s meagre resources

Big Food is just one driving force behind unhealthy eating, and strategies are needed to cut the high cost of associated diseases.
HIV prevention needs to be targeted at women to ensure reduced infection rates.

#AIDS2016: New science may put the power to prevent HIV in women’s hands

Being able to take a pill discreetly, as women have done with contraceptives since the 1950s, is an HIV prevention revolution.

‘How COVID has affected my mental health as a doctor’

During epidemics doctors face moral dilemmas forcing them to make decisions against their conscience — such as...
Thousands of desperately ill people in Nigeria choose to be healed by TB Joshua

Spreading false hope and endangering people’s lives: Why do so many believe in quacks?

Faith healers, psychics, celebrities and others sell their holy water, prayers, bracelets, vitamins and other gimmicks to vulnerable people.
Africa is doing well to immunise against diseases. But the continent still needs support for healthcare.

What can we learn from Angola’s yellow fever outbreak?

The country's yellow fever outbreak is a timely reminder that African countries can't get complacent with their vaccination efforts.
(Baz Ratner

This country has upheld its ban on gay sex. Here’s why it could be...

“The failure to decriminalise consensual same-sex relations will undermine Kenya’s aim of reaching universal health coverage,” UNAids says.
Surviving the process of childbirth is still a battle for many women in Africa.

Birth, a measure of progress

Reducing maternal and newborn mortality has to be a priority if Africa is to reach its potential.

COVID-19 is killing private medical practices. Here’s how to save them

As cases of COVID-19 mount, people are steering clear of clinics and doctors are forced to postpone surgeries to free up beds. If something isn’t done now, there’s slim chance private doctors will have the ability to volunteer for the national response because their jobs — and those of their staff – won’t survive the pandemic.
Telling compelling stories: Amy Green

Crack journalistic team driven by the prospect of telling the continent’s stories

With its expansion to the rest Africa, the Bhekisisa health reporting team is growing.

Employed vs. unemployed: Who is more likely to test HIV positive?

You’re far more likely to be offered an HIV test at a government health facility than at your GP or workplace...
What we learn on the playground about gender and violence may never be unlearned - and it could shape your child forever.

Sex, soccer and social media

A Nigerian and a Kenyan use social media and the football pitch to discuss contraceptives and stop pregnancy.
The United Nations will bring together 192 countries for the fourth high-level meeting on tuberculosis in 2018.

#Unmask TB stigma with a selfie

Fearing social rejection, many patients don't seek treatment. To show your solidarity, don a surgical mask and post a selfie on World TB Day.