West Africa


Acid attacks: ‘I didn’t have the money to buy justice, but I had brains to go on'

In the wake of acid attacks, victims — often women — can feel hopeless. Now, women around the world are fighting back.


When it comes to vaccines, there really is safety in numbers. Here's why

Keith Klugman

Turns out it takes a village to raise a child but also to protect them.


This slashed rates of violence by 70% in some areas. Could it work in SA?

Samira Shackle

In many ways, violence is like cholera, passing from person to person and treating it in similar ways is working to reduce it.


Could you WhatsApp your way to better mental health?

Shola Lawal

A dearth of mental health professionals is leading some people to get creative about counselling.


Why the world may force women to choose: No birth control, no ARVs

Laura Lopez Gonzalez

A new drug could save 25 000 women living with HIV but could it come at the cost of their babies lives?


New science: Why two pills before and after sex could help to save you from HIV

Mia Malan

Men who have sex with men can now take on-demand pre-exposure prophylaxis, or PrEP, safely.


You can't transmit HIV if you take ARVs correctly and are virally suppressed

Mia Malan

Researchers once again confirmed: It’s impossible for HIV-positive people on treatment to transmit the virus through sex — this time among gay men.


If you possess these 10 qualities, you might be a good fit for a high-stress job

Emma Young

Scientists studied soldiers with PTSD and even children who'd witnessed a great tragedy. Did they unlock the secrets of resilience?


Poisonous haze: Why the air we breathe could kill us

Innocent Eteng

Climate change and air pollution could be conspiring against the continent, and fuelling new levels of death and disease.


Tales from Trumpland: Health workers will be forced to bury aborted fetal tissue

Sophie Cousins

In the war on women's bodies, the casualties stretch far beyond US' 50 states.


Afraid of death? Take comfort that you’ll live on in varied and surprising ways

Moheb Costandi

Most of us would rather not know what happens to our bodies after death. But that breakdown gives birth to new life in unexpected ways.


This is what life is like in the world's last country to ban slavery

Seif Kousmate

Photojournalist, Seif Kousmate, photographed and interviewed current and former slaves in Mauritania and got imprisoned by police in the process.


After Ebola: What happens when the virus fades and the NGOs — and money — leave?

Clarissa Sosin

Ebola wiped out nearly 10% of Liberia’s doctors and nurses. Take a look at life for those it left behind.


Old birth rites, new ways

Bhekisisa Reporters

When bringing a new life into the world risks taking another, even old traditions have to adopt new ways.


Speak more than one language? This is what it does to your brain.

Gaia Vince

Speaking more than one language could lead to better tests scores and even being a more empathetic person.


Why it could cost less than R120 per year to save a life

Alex Ezeh, Ann Starrs

Maternal deaths in developing regions would fall by 73% if all women had access to contraception and maternal healthcare, shows new research.


Should government health schemes pay for infertility treatment?

Nelisiwe Msomi

"Women are blamed for infertility when, in fact, as we know from research, it is quite often on the man’s side.”


'No sex, no coffee, no ARVs': Former president's quackery could land him in court

Adri Kotze , Momodou L. Jaiteh

Former Gambian president Yahya Jammeh will be the first African head of state to be tried for violating the rights of HIV-positive people.


Do 1 in 5 Nigerian adults really suffer from long-term depression?

Bhekisisa Reporters

Why the World Bank may have peddled some dodgy facts about this mental health condition.


Black? A woman? Read why you’re more likely to be a victim of online trolls

Gaia Vince

Are social media algorithms designed to prey the mental health of women and people of colour?


Seven things you should know about this country's largest Lassa fever outbreak

Coumba Sylla, Africa Check

Nigeria's latest and largest epidemic has claimed almost 100 lives. Find out more about the virus.


What life without toilets looks like

Peter Beaumont

Open defecation is a reality for many people around the world. Here's what it translates to.


[LISTEN] How (not) to clean your vagina

Dylan Bush, Mia Malan

Our Mia Malan speaks to medical doctor Tlaleng Mofokeng about how to stay happy and healthy down there.


Want to write a story people won’t forget? [WATCH] this

Mia Malan

When it comes to weaving a good yarn, the devil really is in the detail.


[WATCH] What does the law say about rape?

Mia Malan, Dylan Bush

Do you know what the law says about rape in South Africa? Our Mia Malan explains the legal ins and outs in three minutes.


Here are 12 things we've learned from five years of donor-funded journalism

Mia Malan

Work at a non-profit media house? Then you know your job is not just reporting anymore.


Is Nigeria really home to almost one in four of the world's malaria cases?

Allwell Okpi

International insecticide brand Mortein claims that Nigeria contributes 23% of the world’s malaria cases. Does the figure hit the mark?


Scientists confirm what women always knew: Men really are the weaker sex

Kate Hodal

In times of famine, epidemic and hardship over the past 250 years, women have consistently outlived men, find researchers


Can you can turn yourself into a broccoli-loving, marathon-running genius?

Will Storr

We used to believe our brains couldn’t be changed. Now we believe they can – if we want it enough. But is that true?


Women forced into sex to pay hospital bills, study says

Kate Hodal

Patients too poor to settle medical debts are chained to drain pipes, starved and abused in health centres across parts of Africa.