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Short Form Journalism by the Bhekisisa Team

The XX factor: Could the genetic make-up of people with uteruses give them the fighting edge when it comes to surviving the world's elimination rounds?

Five things you should know about your vagina

Science is learning more about your vagina. So should you.
Remote: Zodwa Zulu*

It’s only 32km to the state clinic, but for the poor that’s a world...

Some residents in rural towns in Mpumalanga have to chose between buying food or going to the doctor.

‘I had to kill so many people’: The battle to protect children in conflicts

25,000 grave violations were committed against children in conflict in 2019, says the UN, which hopes to highlight issue with new international day.
Much of the sugars consumed today are “hidden” in processed foods that are not usually seen as sweets.

How much sugar do you drink?

Half a litre of Coke contains 10 teaspoons of sugar – almost the entire recommended daily sugar allowance. But fruit juice is as bad.
Editar Ochieng leaves a chemist in Kibera having purchased termination pills. (Kate Holt, The Guardian)

“People have normalised rape… but no one talks about abortion. When I do, the...

With terminations outlawed in Kenya, women and girls in its largest slum have to rely on expensive and unreliable under-the-counter pills,...
Aisha Danyaya recovers from surgery in the Children’s Hospital in Sokoto, Nigeria. The disease can be fatal. (Adavize Baiye, MSF)

Inside the flesh-eating disease you’ve probably never heard about but should

Less than 15% of patients seek out care for this vicious form of gangrene.
In the company of women: Judia

The village where men are banned

Inside the Kenyan village that began as a refuge for survivors of sexual violence.

Behind the masks: Meet the people who keep Gauteng’s field hospital going

Get to know the cleaners, plumbers and therapists who work at the Nasrec field hospital. Plus, find out what happens to newspapers,...
More than 30 000 people in Zimbabwe have been tested for HIV as part of large-scale population-based HIV assessments expected to take place in up to 20 countries.

Home visits give instant HIV results and data set to guide more than a...

The population assessments of the epidemic in sub-Sahara yields information of benefit to patients and to each nation’s plan of action
Pregnant woman

Solar power, text messages fight maternal deaths in rural Cameroon

Solar power, solar electricity and mobile technology are helping to reduce the rate of maternal mortality in Cameroon.

‘No bed for people like me’: When the old are left to die

Despite clear evidence they are most at risk, older people are seen as dispensable as younger patients are prioritised in the...
Protesting journalists

India arrests dozens of journalists in clampdown on critics of COVID-19 response

Reporters for independent outlets, many in rural areas, say pressure won’t deter them from covering embarrassing stories
A doctor bends down to check young cancer patient's heartbeat.

From the mouths of babes: This is what it’s like to be diagnosed with...

Death comes for us all and when it does, we hope it’s a good one. We hope it has meaning, we...
Being overweight is considered to be a form of malnutrition.

Six weighty figures to watch: The SA and global obesity epidemic in numbers

Numbers don't lie: A new report shows how people across the world keep piling on the kilos.
There are fewer than 10 paediatric heart surgeons in South Africa's public health sector - forcing tiny patients to wait months for surgery.

When the tiniest hearts break: Behind SA’s shortage of paediatric heart surgeons

The country can't produce its own paediatric heart surgeons. But that may be beginning to change, starting in Cape Town.

Skeletons and closets: How one university reburied the dead

In the 1920s, a Northern Cape farmer dug up some of the remains of previous workers — some of whom had...