Features


This is what it's like being a sex worker: 'Police dragged me out in public naked'

Dylan Bush

Go inside one of the country's most dangerous jobs.


What do a herd of goats, a few cattle, and a baby have in common? Find out

Christabel Ligami

Here's how northwest Kenya gets nomadic families to health services.


'I opened her up and found her womb was rotten from the infection'

Laura Lopez Gonzalez

Obstetrician Eddie Mhlanga often had to attend to women who had unsafe abortions during apartheid, when abortion was illegal in South Africa.


Pregnant? Need an abortion? Here’s where not to go

Pontsho Pilane

Are faith-based NGOs breaking the law when they refuse to give women information on where to terminate their pregnancies?


Menstruation by any other name: The more than 5000 ways we say 'period'

Roxy de Villiers

Know what The Hunt for Red October is? We’re not talking about the Sean Connery movie, we’re talking about your period.


Acid attacks: ‘I didn’t have the money to buy justice, but I had brains to go on'

In the wake of acid attacks, victims — often women — can feel hopeless. Now, women around the world are fighting back.


Dying of the light: How Soweto lost its only hospice

Joan van Dyk

Hospice isn't just a place to die but funding cuts – and that perception – could be killing our chances of a kinder death as refuges close


#FreeToBleed: 'A pool of blood gushed down my thighs. My white socks were red.'

Pontsho Pilane

Shame doesn't start when menstruation begins. It is built in slow steps.


This slashed rates of violence by 70% in some areas. Could it work in SA?

Samira Shackle

In many ways, violence is like cholera, passing from person to person and treating it in similar ways is working to reduce it.


Could you WhatsApp your way to better mental health?

Shola Lawal

A dearth of mental health professionals is leading some people to get creative about counselling.


How a better death starts long before we're dying

Helena Dolny

When one man was on his deathbed, his family knew how he wanted to die and could respect that.


Why the world may force women to choose: No birth control, no ARVs

Laura Lopez Gonzalez

A new drug could save 25 000 women living with HIV but could it come at the cost of their babies lives?


If you possess these 10 qualities, you might be a good fit for a high-stress job

Emma Young

Scientists studied soldiers with PTSD and even children who'd witnessed a great tragedy. Did they unlock the secrets of resilience?


Poisonous haze: Why the air we breathe could kill us

Innocent Eteng

Climate change and air pollution could be conspiring against the continent, and fuelling new levels of death and disease.


Tales from Trumpland: Health workers will be forced to bury aborted fetal tissue

Sophie Cousins

In the war on women's bodies, the casualties stretch far beyond US' 50 states.


Does South Africa need a Human Rights Commission?

Joan van Dyk

History repeats as old health emergencies emerge anew. Is the health ombud the person to lead fights the Human Rights Commission started?


Not a school in sight: Autistic children travel 500 km to learn

Pontsho Pilane

A mother's love led her to South Africa to find a school for her son with autism.


Saved: How drug users gained the power to reverse overdoses

Carrie Arnold

Find out how drug users banded together to use a simple injection to save thousands of lives.


'I was kicked out of our house by his parents', say widows

Will Baxter

If a man dies in the Central African Republic, his wife is at risk of being evicted from their home by his relatives.


This is what life is like in the world's last country to ban slavery

Seif Kousmate

Photojournalist, Seif Kousmate, photographed and interviewed current and former slaves in Mauritania and got imprisoned by police in the process.


After Ebola: What happens when the virus fades and the NGOs — and money — leave?

Clarissa Sosin

Ebola wiped out nearly 10% of Liberia’s doctors and nurses. Take a look at life for those it left behind.


Old birth rites, new ways

Bhekisisa Reporters

When bringing a new life into the world risks taking another, even old traditions have to adopt new ways.


Speak more than one language? This is what it does to your brain.

Gaia Vince

Speaking more than one language could lead to better tests scores and even being a more empathetic person.


Who killed Ntombizodwa Matthews? Politics, protest & corruption in the North West

Bhekisisa Reporters

A month after she was wheeled out of a North West hospital in a barrow, Ntombizodwa Matthews met her end. Her family blames politics for her death.


Football’s dashed hopes: The teenagers sold a Premier League lie

Pete Pattisson, The Guardian

They thought they were signing up for a dream but it turned out to be a trafficking nightmare.


Abortion in South Africa: A reporting guide for journalists

Bhekisisa team

Bhekisisa's new manual provides handy information on abortion data in South Africa, how procedures work and what the law says.


The future of water: From your toilet to your tap and back again

Thalia Holmes

The reality is many of us look at water like we do a takeaway container.


Obesity: Is eating slap tjips as bad as smoking?

Adri Kotze

For millennials, it ain't looking good, but are hard-hitting campaigns just fat-shaming and counterproductive?


'No sex, no coffee, no ARVs': Former president's quackery could land him in court

Adri Kotze , Momodou L. Jaiteh

Former Gambian president Yahya Jammeh will be the first African head of state to be tried for violating the rights of HIV-positive people.


Local is lekker: This African innovation could save hundreds of babies each year

Justus Wanzala, Adri Kotze

Every year, hundreds of thousands of children die gasping for air. This could help to change that.